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Britain's foremost contemporary artist Sarah Lucas takes on Venice http://t.co/4M6fY0CYv1 #venicebiennale2015 http://t.co/vDloxji65P
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‘No one’s told me off about the fannies yet’: Sarah Lucas at the Venice Biennale http://t.co/bS7SMQ19nG http://t.co/hxg2yZa0IE
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Britain's foremost contemporary artist Sarah Lucas takes on Venice

May 6, 2015 by Ishah

Sarah Lucas has been selected by the British Council to represent Britain at the 56th Venice International Art Biennale. Lucas will present a major solo show in the British Pavilion running from 9 May to 22 November 2015. Sarah Lucas will be following artists such as Jeremy Deller, Steve McQueen, Tracey Emin, Gilbert & George and Anish Kapoor, who have all filled the British Pavilion at the prestigious event.


Sarah Lucas, Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ. Photo: Julian Simmons

Lucas' work has consistently been characterised by its humour and the transformation of every day objects such as, food, tabloid newspapers, furniture, toilets and cigarettes into visual metaphors of human body parts. By turns lewd and lyrical, punning and paradoxical, her art continues to deal with sex, death, abjectness and notion of Englishness. “Humour is about negotiating the contradictions thrown up by convention”, Lucas said. “To a certain extent, humour and seriousness are interchangeable. Otherwise it wouldn't be funny. Or devastating.”

‘Florian’ by Sarah Lucas, Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London 2013

Statistics show that Lucas' work makes impressive returns on investments (herwork is up 187% since 1999). Auctions of her work have great sell-through rates over the last few years, including a rate of 87% in 2013. The same year saw the artist's highest auction record of $470,141 for a single work sold at Christie's London, and Lucas' average sale price reached $61,520. With the forthcoming interest generated by the Venice Biennale (May 9th - November 11th), more growth in the coming years wouldn't be surprising.

‘LOVE IS A BIRD LOVE IS A BURDEN’ by Sarah Lucas & Olivier Garbay

Sarah Lucas has collaborated with various artists such as Tracey Emin, William Corwin and Olivier Garbay. Lucas and Garbay created - The Mug, a book that explores both artists working methods. Designed in the style of an alphabetised address book, it catalogues their thoughts and ideas, mixing free-form Anglo-Gallic poetry with various artistic experiments, dabbling in dirt, dominoes, and drinking. 

In addition to The Mug, Sarah Lucas have collaborated to create a freestanding resin sculpture moulded from the plaster cast of their entwined hands and forearms: LOVE IS A BIRD LOVE IS A BUREN. Whether battling or embracing, their arms are a metaphor for the unification and struggle often experienced in love, and physically manifest some of the ideas recorded in their book.

 A cool and elegant work, the resin sculpture stands upright on its elbows, but can be turned to sit on alternative edges. Its surface has a slightly grainy texture, true to the suggestion of human skin and wrinkles. The resin is tinted evenly with Pantone-matched colour, but where the thickness of the sculpture varies, so too does the light passing through it, giving the colours a variation in intensity. The broader forearms carry a denser colour than the fingertips, which have a delicate luminosity.


Sarah Lucas and Olivier Garbay at The Mug launch, Other Criteria London, February 2009

NGORONGORO - Artist Weekend Berlin

April 29, 2015 by Mary

For the period of Berlin gallery weekend and the first time in it's history, the 5000 square meter studio spaces of Lehderstrasse 34 hosts an incredibly diverse exhibition of paintings, sculpture, multi media, installation, film and photography, in which artists invite other artists to exhibit in the context of this studio environment, thus returning the viewer to the very place of art's genesis. This extensive group exhibition features 100 Berlin based and international artists. The exhibition site, a former GDR semiconductor factory, which was shut down after the fall of the Wall, comprises a number of architectural structures dating from different eras including a turn-of- the-century power plant and the manufacturing halls from the 70’s. Today, it is a sprawling studio development, renovated over the past five years by a flourishing group of Berlin-based artists.

Ngorongoro is a collapsed volcanic crater in Tanzania, on the border of the Serengeti. Almost undisturbed by human influence, it boasts a biosphere of unique diversity with Africa’s highest density of mammal predators and is listed as a natural and cultural World Heritage Site.

Echoing this primordial ecosystem, the exhibition sees a kaleidoscopic survey of artistic practise coming together in one event, staged within the creative crucible of art’s origins – the studio. The combination of names such as Mat CollishawPolly MorganTim Noble and Sue Webster, demonstrates the complex networks that artists build amongst themselves, a phenomenon that has, so far, been little explored. Therefore the artist list is not defined by the usual curatorial criteria of concept, form or discourse – but primarily based on intuition. The result is a dynamic confrontation of equally weighted participants, illustrating the initiators’ artistic reference system and the extensive diversity of their network.

The exhibition is initiated by Christian Achenbach, Jonas Burgert, Zhivago Duncan, Andreas Golder, John Isaacs and David Nicholson.

Exhibition opening: Thursday 30 April 2015; 2 pm – 12 midnight
Opening hours: Friday 1 May, Saturday 2 May, Sunday 3 May 2015; 10 am – 12 midnight

Black Bandits

April 23, 2015 by Mary

The ‘Black Bandits’ exhibition opens today in Berlin at ‘The House on Lützowplatz’ to celebrates Adolph Freiherr von Lützow and the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo (June 18, 1815) as the end of the Napoleonic Wars. This exhibition features two works by Johannes Albers


‘Saccharibacter floricola’ by Johannes Albers, 190cm X 180cm, oil on canvas, 2014

The House on Lützowplatz (‘Haus am Lützowplatz’) is an exhibition and event space supported by the Art Association founded in 1960 “House on Lützowplatz - Cultural Patronage Berlin”.

The exhibition in the Lützowplatz does not pursue purely historical review of the topic. Being aware of the strength and explosiveness of the current historical narrative, it relies on the autonomy of contemporary art in terms of a resonance thereby open space between past and present.It's in the works, which have been partially established especially for the exhibition, not the illustration of history, but the mark of fractures and dislocations in the process of remembering the events of two hundred years ago, and their traces in today's collective consciousness.




‘200 Years’ by Johannes Albers, 90cm X 90cm X 51 cm, glass, dust, waste, 2015

Ludwig Adolph Wilhelm Freiherr von Lützow (May 18, 1782 - December 6, 1834) was commander of a volunteer unit that was formed along with other so-called ‘Hunter Detachment’ for increased staffing of the Prussian army for the war against France in February 1813.The Lützow Free Corps consisted largely of “non-Prussian foreigners”. Their clothes were brought uniformly colored black, resulting in particular for the cavalry of the Lützower the nickname “Black Hunter” was derived.Narrated is also on the French side, the term “brigands noirs”, ie black guerrillas or bandits, as their opponents as regular troops did sometimes not consider them.

The Lützow Free Corps was ultimately not very successful militarily, but gained in the course of the national liberation movement and the pre-March legendary status.In it fought a particularly high proportion of artists and intellectuals.At the end of the Napoleonic Wars, after the victory over Napoleon at the Battle of Leipzig (19 10.1813) and the conquest of Paris in May 1814, the Free Corps was disbanded.The professional soldiers of the Lutzow were integrated into regular regiments of the Prussian army.Lützow commanded a cavalry brigade during the last coalition war against Napoleon and was seriously wounded at Ligny on June 16, 1815.Parts of its original Freikorps fought two days later at the Battle of Waterloo and Napoleon captured personal car with hat, sword, and all orders.

Several Lützower engaged after 1815 in the fraternity movement and wore their black uniforms as a sign of aspirations to join the democratic ideals of freedom of the French Revolution with thoughts of a unified nation-state.The first student fraternity founded in Jena - before the students compounds were separated in country teams - received in 1816 a flag whose colors relate to the uniform of the Lützow Free Corps had (black skirt, red cuffs, gold buttons) and from the off, according to a among historians not undisputed evidence chain, then the first black-red-gold colors ableiteten 1848 officially used in the Frankfurt National Assembly as a symbol of a unified, parliamentary Germany.

The Lützowplatz was named after Baron von Lützow on 23 November 1869.

New print by Damien Hirst: 'Canon'

April 21, 2015 by Mary

Other Criteria are pleased to unveil ‘Canon‘, Damien Hirst's new butterfly print. 

Having been depicted in art, embedded in resin and characterised in literature for many centuries, the butterfly has wide significance as a symbol of love, regeneration, fortune, freedom, spirituality and death. The butterfly has fascinated Damien Hirst since his early days as an artist and is arguably one of the most popular and frequently used motifs in his work.

You have to find universal triggers. Everyone’s frightened of glass, everyone’s frightened of sharks, everyone loves butterflies” Damien Hirst

History is now: 7 Artists Take On Britain

April 15, 2015 by Mary

‘History is now: 7 Artists Take On Britain’, housed at The Hayward Gallery, is an exhibition offering a radical new way of thinking about how we got to where we are today.


Eduardo Paolozzi, Take-off, 1972 (from original Bunkcollages 1947-52)
© Trustees of the Paolozzi Foundation. Licensed by DACS 2015

The Hayward Gallery let seven artists take on the cultural history of the United Kingdom. John Akomfrah, Simon Fujiwara, Roger Hiorns, Hannah Starkey, Richard Wentworth and Jane and Louise Wilson each curate different sections of the exhibition, looking at particular periods of cultural history. Their varied and curatorial 'takes' on Britain provide new perspectives and illuminate key moments in the nation's journey from the post-war period to the present day.

The artists pursue inventive ways of exploring our recent history, spanning ideas and topics as varied as the Cold War, post-Thatcherite society, protest movements, feminism, BSE, and celebrity culture.

They artists have selected over 250 objects from both public and private art collections as well as everyday artefacts including maps, costumes, newspapers, films, and personal diaries, together with scientific and military displays. Two works from Damien Hirst's iconic series – ‘Natural History’ and the Spot Paintings – are on display as part of Roger Hiorns examination of the BSE epidemic.


‘Out of Sight. Out of Mind.’ (1991) by Damien Hirst
Courtesy of White Cube © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2015

While each section of the exhibition is distinct in both focus and style, taken together, ‘History is now: 7 Artists Take On Britain’ provokes reflection and debate on the events, people, and objects that have shaped the nation in recent decades, so informing our future decisions and directions.

‘History is now: 7 Artists Take On Britain’ is co-curated by Dr Cliff Lauson, Hayward Gallery Curator.

This exhibition will be running until April 26th.

PHOTOS: The Folly Acres Cook Book Launch NYC

April 10, 2015 by Mary

Other Criteria were pleased to launch The Folly Acres Cook Book in New York City on Wednesday, April 8th.

Sue Webster presented her semi-autographical cookbook and read some extracts. The book combines recipes from the kitchen of the Gloucestershire smallholding shared by the artist-duo Tim Noble and Sue Webster, along with drawings, photographs, thoughts, anecdotes and personal memories.

‘Somewhere along the way, my artistic instinct got the better of me and what started life with good intention as an authentic cookbook somewhere in the style of Gwyneth Paltrow — it started to melt away halfway into something far more interesting and less practical' explained Sue Webster. 'This is a punk-y cookbook. This is a fucked-up cookbook,' she added. 'Some of them are edible, and some of them are just ideas.’

Sue Webster’s close friend, PJ Harvey, contributed a poem as an introduction to the book - inspired by her visit to Folly Acres, which she read at the launch. PJ Harvey also realised a surprise performance and sang a few tracks. 'I had to leave the room and come backstage and cry, because that last song of Polly’s' confessed Sue Webster.

They talk about it...

STYLE.COM: “Webster is bringing the viewer inside the artist’s mind with The Folly Acres Cook Book, a just-released collection of homegrown recipes, illustrated diary entries, and autobiographical scrawlings rendered by Webster from 2010 to 2014.”
www.style.com/culture/art/sue-webster-folly-acres-cookbook

ARTINFO: “Harvey herself appeared in full force to celebrate at Other Criteria, reading aloud the poem she wrote for the book’s introduction before grabbing her black lacquered acoustic and launching into a few of Webster’s favorites”
http://blogs.artinfo.com/artintheair/pj-harvey-cameos-at-sue-webster-cookbook-launch

Photo: Samantha Nandez/BFAnyc.com

MTV:REDEFINE honours Michael Craig-Martin

April 10, 2015 by Ishah

MTV RE:DEFINE is an exhibition and auction that brings together music and iconic commissioned artworks by established and emerging artists.

‘Fake’ by Michael Craig-Martin

The event will be held at The Goss-Michael Foundation in Dallas on Friday the 10th of April 2015 where iconic artist Michael Craig-Martin will be honoured. Together the MTV Staying Alive Foundation, The Goss-Michael Foundation, and Future Tense, has raised over $4 million in support of MTV Staying Alive Foundation’s fight against HIV/AIDS. 

‘Umbrella (blue)’ by Michael Craig-Martin will be on sale at MTV RE:DEFINE auction.
(Courtesy of Gagosian Gallery)

The unique event includes cocktails and dinner, live and silent auctions of world-class contemporary art, and musical entertainment. MTV Staying Alive Foundation is a grassroots HIV prevention and awareness charity that focuses on engaging, educating and empowering youth communities around the world. Dallas Contemporary is a non-collecting art museum that presents new and challenging ideas from regional, national, and international artists. As part of the programme, ten works by Michael Craig-Martin will be on display spread over ten public spaces in Dallas. 

Michael Craig-Martin, conceptual artist and painter is mostly famous for his iconic line drawings of every day objects where colour and line are key to his particular minimalist aesthetic, which has been imitated widely in the fields of art and design. Craig-Martin continues to work in various mediums, always maintaining an elegant restraint and conceptual clarity. He studied Fine Art at the Yale University School of Art and Architecture and, on completion of his studies in 1966, he moved to London where he has lived ever since. In 1980 Craig-Martin became a tutor at Goldsmiths College teaching acclaimed artists such as, Damien Hirst, Sarah Lucas and Gary Hume. 

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