Other Criteria in Iceland

July 30, 2009 by Kay

Damien Hirst's 'For the Love of God: The Making of The Diamond Skull' has been spotted in Reykjavik in the Living Art Museum. Thanks to Susanna Bianchini for the photograph below.

Send in your photographs of Other Criteria publication's, or artworks, seen across the world and we will post it here! Submissions to website@othercriteria.com and please remember to tell us exactly where you found us!

Other Criteria's 'For the Love of God: The Making of The Diamond Skull' in Living Art Museum, Reykjavik

Remember, we currently have free shipping on Other Criteria publications when bought through our website. To purchase this book, please click here. Alternatively you can pop into one of our shops.

If you are interested in stocking Other Criteria books in your bookshop, make a trade enquiry by clicking here.

Photos: Gary Webb launch

July 20, 2009 by Ellie

Last Thursday we launched 11 new and unique works by Gary Webb at our shop on Hinde Street. Below are a few snapshots of the evening - thank you to all of you who came and showed your support. The sculptures will be on display in the shop until 14th August.

Watch this blog for developments on our next OC short - this time following Gary's production methods, with plenty of studio shots and interviews.

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Noble & Webster to Triumph in Moscow

July 14, 2009 by Ellie

Tim Noble and Sue Webster are to exhibit at Triumph Gallery, Moscow in an exhibition entitled 20 Modern Classics from 22 September – 9 October 2009. Organised in conjunction with RS&A Ltd in London, the show will be accompanied by a 120-page catalogue and reflects their interest in silhouettes, found materials and self-analysis. To find out more about the exhibition, read the gallery's press release below. Images courtesy of Truimph.

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The central piece is the extraordinary work, Scarlett - a kinetic installation consisting of a worktable (upon which the artists have been working for the last decade) covered with numerous bizarre mechanical toys all of which incessantly move, chatter and jerk. In this powerful installation, innocent children’s playthings from Action Men to Barbie dolls have been transformed into objects of apparent perversion. Simultaneously humorous and disturbing these specially modified toys display a cornucopia of psychological and childhood references - like a laboratory to test out theories about the subconscious pressures and childhood instincts emanating from the unconscious mind.

Another work in the exhibition, Bloody Haemorrhaging Narcissus, is a more characteristic Noble and Webster piece, comprising a sculpture on a tall plinth whose cast shadow creates a silhouette of the artists’ facial profiles. This shocking work is made from a plethora of bright red silicone rubber casts of Webster’s fingers and Noble’s penis in various states of arousal. A variation on this work, The Wedding Cake (2008) is a plaster cast of the same plethora of appendages encased within a sculptural reference from another work, (Untitled) Spinning Heads.

Spinning Heads, Reverse, 2006Spinning Heads, Reverse

A series of bronze sculptures also in the show are entitled (Untitled) Spinning Heads and (Untitled) Spinning Heads in Reverse. (Untitled) Spinning Heads (2005) is based on Bertelli’s Continuing Profile of Mussolini (1933) – a sculpted profile of Mussolini rotated 360 degrees – the result being more machine-like than human. (Untitled) Spinning Heads in Reverse depicts the artist’s profiles and refers to the famous ‘Rubin Vase’ technique – an optical illusion presenting the viewer with a mental choice of two interpretations, each of which is valid.  You see two vases or you see two profiles of the artists’ faces.

Two further shadow works will also be included in the show, the first a remake of Miss Understood and Mr Meanor, the original of which was destroyed in the infamous fire at Momart’s storage unit in 2004. Two sticks loaded with trash and personal items stand side-by-side and, when light is directed towards the trash, a shadow is cast on the wall behind revealing a perfect silhouette of the artists’ heads in profile and conjuring up the memory of severed heads placed on spikes outside the Tower of London in the Middle Ages. The other shadow work, Rat and Trap, uses the same process to cast a shadow of a single rat precariously walking towards a rat trap.

As a final addition to the show Noble and Webster have chosen to premier the short film Ornament (In Crisis) (1995) in which Tim Noble appears submerged underwater in a fish tank. This work was the first ever collaboration by Noble and Webster and it was also almost their last.

Spinning Heads, Angle, 2005Spinning Heads, Angle, 2005

Gary Webb Launch - Thursday

July 13, 2009 by Ellie

Other Criteria invites you to celebrate the launch of 11 new unique works from Gary Webb, all of which are available exclusively through OC. Please come and join us at our shop, 14 Hinde Street, London, W1U 3BG from 6-8pm on Thursday 16th July.

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Press release: Gary Webb's Other Criteria series of 11 unique works are constructed in the same way as all of Webb's sculptures, but made to a new scale that the artist has employed for the first time.

Webb’s sculptures embrace the formal interplay between geometric and organic shapes, line and volume, reflective and transparent surfaces. The work seems to address many of the issues of 1960s Modernist abstract sculpture, but these issues are playfully turned askew and complicated by Webb’s use of materials, pop references and humour.?? Webb’s unexpected configurations of manufactured and natural objects result in constructions that often defy definition and are distinctly his own. A wide array of materials is brought together with a great sense of fun; brilliant colours, glossy synthetics, chromed surfaces, chunky Perspex and hand-carved wood could all constitute a single piece. At times, abstract elements are associated with features that are almost baroque. Modernist sculpture is honoured and parodied all at once through the use of its vocabulary to express a representational language.??The sculptures sometimes seem to pose as functional objects, and they possess a retro quality through their relations to 20th century art and design. Brancusi, Phillip King, Richard Artschwager and Donald Judd are brought to mind as well as automobiles, toys and furniture.

Gary Webb was born in 1973 in Bascombe, Dorset and studied at Goldsmith’s College of Art from 1994-97. He lives and works in London and is represented by The Approach Gallery.?? Webb’s sculptures are largely created from synthetic and industrial materials and use human emotion as their starting point, almost always beginning with a drawing before progressing to three dimensions. Constructed as assemblages of colourful and glossy shapes, the artist plays with abstraction and geometry to explore the linear and volumetric qualities of form. ??Recent solo exhibitions include Gary Webb, Bortolami Dayan, New York, 2006; Revolution Oil, The Approach, London, 2008 and Export, Atelier Hermes, Seoul, Korea, 2008. Group exhibitions include The British Art Show 6, Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead and touring, 2005; Pour de Vrai, Musee des Beaux-Arts, Nancy, France, 2005 and Sublime Experiences and Perceptions in Contemporary Sculpture, Pilar Parra & Romero, Madrid, Spain, 2007.

Johannes Albers at Schinkel Pavillon

July 7, 2009 by Ellie

Albers' exhibition, Das Finale, recently opened at Schinkel Pavillon in Berlin and runs from 19th June - 1st August 2009.  A selection of images are below but for more information, click here.

Das Finale, Installation view, Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin,
© Johannes Albers, Courtesy Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin

Das Finale, Installation view, Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin

Das Finale, Installation view, Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin,
© Johannes Albers, Courtesy Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin

Das Finale, Installation view, Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin, © Johannes Albers, Courtesy Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin

Das Finale, Installation view, Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin,
© Johannes Albers, Courtesy Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin
Installation view, © Johannes Albers, Courtesy Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin

Das Finale, Installation view, Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin,
© Johannes Albers, Courtesy Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin

Das Finale, Installation view, Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin, © Johannes Albers, Courtesy Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin

The Serpentine shows Jeff Koons

July 6, 2009 by Ellie

The Serpentine's newly opened show marks the first of Jeff Koons' major exhibitions in a public gallery in England and presents paintings and sculptures from his Popeye series, which he began in 2002. To read the press release and for further information, click here. Open from 2nd July - 13th September 2009.

Jeff Koons, Olive Oyl, 2003, Oil on canvas, 274.3 x 213.4 cm
© 2009 Jeff Koons, Courtesy Serpentine Gallery, London

Jeff Koons, Olive Oyl, 2003, Oil on canvas, 274.3 x 213.4 cm, © 2009 Jeff Koons, Courtesy Serpentine Gallery, London

Jeff Koons, Acrobat, 2003-2009, Polychromed aluminum, galvanized steel, wood, straw, 228.9 x 148 x 64.8 cm, © 2009 Jeff Koons, Courtesy Serpentine Gallery, LondonJeff Koons, Acrobat, 2003-2009, Polychromed aluminum, galvanized steel, wood, straw, 228.9 x 148 x 64.8 cm, © 2009 Jeff Koons, Courtesy Serpentine Gallery, London

Jeff Koons, Dogpool (Logs), 2003-2008, Polychromed aluminum, wood, coated steel chain, 213.4 x 171.5 x 151.1 cm, © 2009 Jeff Koons, Courtesy Serpentine Gallery, LondonJeff Koons, Dogpool (Logs), 2003-2008, Polychromed aluminum, wood, coated steel chain, 213.4 x 171.5 x 151.1 cm, © 2009 Jeff Koons, Courtesy Serpentine Gallery, London

Gay Icons, National Portrait Gallery

July 6, 2009 by Ellie

Australian photographer Polly Borland is taking part in the National Portrait Gallery's latest exhibition to celebrate the significance of gay icons and their contribution to British culture. Ten selectors have worked with the gallery to identify six icons each who may or may not be gay but who they have considered to be important to our history and culture. To find out more about the exhibition, click here and here.

Open from 2nd July - 18th October 2009.

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