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Last day at #KIAF2017. More images of our booth here: https://t.co/fv9uEBAHMs https://t.co/xcvz9gHd97
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At #KIAF2017 until Sunday! https://t.co/Q7hrfa5Jki https://t.co/GUDbztVN5V
4 days ago

Last day at @artriofair https://t.co/tIa3T9DwqX
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Last day at @expochicago https://t.co/krDIOpcn5O
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At @artriofair presenting limited edition works by #DamienHirst. Booth D10 https://t.co/SDMPzPOh0c
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Join us booth 843 at @expochicago this weekend! #DamienHirst https://t.co/NOGos3U6vO
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Other Criteria is at @expochicago booth 848 until Sunday 17th September #Damien Hirst #EduardoSarabiahttps://t.co/Oyl50Kve26
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Tracey Emin at Southbank Centre, 23 May 2011

July 29, 2011 by Kay

Thanks to the Southbank Centre for sharing their audio of the Tracey Emin talk they had back in May 2011. Emin's exhibition Love is What You Want is showing until Monday 29th August 2011.

Takashi Murakami at Gagosian, London

July 28, 2011 by Kay

I think the Japanese male sexual complex originated in the two-dimensional world –animation, games and so on – which then transferred to small three-dimensional sculptures. But before my sculptures Miss Ko (1997) and My Lonesome Cowboy (1998), it had never been represented life-size. --Takashi Murakami

TAKASHI MURAKAMI 3m Girl (Original rendering by Seiji Matsuyama, modeling by BOME and Genpachi Tokaimura, full scale sculpture by Lucky-Wide Co., Ltd.), 2011 Fiberglass reinforced plastic and steel, 106 5/16 x 38 3/16 x 47 3/16 inches (270 x 97 x 120 cm), Ed. of 3 © Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Prototype of work to be exhibited: modeling by BOME, original rendering by Seiji Matsuyama.

Takashi Murakami 27th June - 5th August 2011 Gagosian Gallery , 6-24 Britannia Street, WC1X 9JD

In his distinctive "Superflat" style, which employs highly refined, traditional Japanese painting techniques and formats to depict a charged mix of historical subject matter, Pop, animé and otaku content within a flattened representational picture-plane, Murakami moves freely within an ever-expanding field of aesthetic issues and cultural inspirations. Parallel to his distinctive toonish formulations of utopian and dystopian themes, he has recollected and revitalized religious and secular narratives of transcendence and enlightenment favoured by non-conformist Japanese artists from the Early Modern era, commonly considered to be counterpart to the Western Romantic tradition. By situating himself within their legacy of bold and lively individualism in a manner that is entirely his own, he revealed himself to be an artist in dialogue with history and very much of his time.

TAKASHI MURAKAMI Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce © Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Prototype of work to be exhibited: modeling by BOME, original rendering by Seiji Matsuyama.

Murakami’s latest group of paintings explores his complex ambivalence to the legacy of cosmopolitan painter Kuroda Seiki, who brought yōga or Western-style painting to Meiji- period Japan. Kuroda broadly promoted the genre of history painting, as well as the validity of the nude figure as a subject for art. Taking Kuroda’s famous triptych, Wisdom, Impression, Sentiment (c.1900), Murakami consciously reclaims it in a new iteration by applying traditional nihonga techniques like gold- and silver-leafing, as well as recasting the realistically rendered nude figures in contemporary manga style. When it was first shown, Kuroda’s work caused great controversy because of its content, however, as Murakami reminds in paintings such as Shunga: Gibbons (2010) and Shunga: Bow Wow (2010), Japan had embraced explicit erotic content in art as early as the twelfth century. By the Edo period, the long-established genre of shunga sought to express a varied world of contemporary sexual possibilities, often referred to as the creation of a “pornotopia,” an idealised, eroticised and fantastical world parallel to contemporary urban life. In Murakami’s contemporary shunga, graphic depictions of exaggerated and engorged male and female genitals are set against delirious backgrounds of image and pattern.

TAKASHI MURAKAMI Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce © Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Prototype of work to be exhibited: modeling by BOME, original rendering by Seiji Matsuyama.

This theme continues into sculptures, which feature collaborations with key artists working in Japan’s popular otaku culture including Seiji Matsuyama -- creator of the controversial manga “My Wife is an Elementary School Student” – and BOME, a figure sculptor who previously collaborated on Murakami’s first life-size sculpture, Miss Ko2 (1997), an ebullient Playboy fantasy translated into manga cuteness and proportions. Whereas Nurse Ko2 (2011) relates closely to the earlier sculpture, with its leggy, busty verticality and sexy uniform (right down to a suggestively loaded syringe), 3-Meter Girl (2011) is an absurdist composition that pushes form and content to new extremes. She stands with feet spread wide, her abundant hair roiling around her like an elaborate rococo frame as if to steady her petite body against the whopping pendular breasts whose size and weight threaten to topple her. A monumental cast and highly polished metal penis of towering proportions, Mr Big Mushroom (2011), is a realist, manmade take on the traditional stone lingam. Together with Miss Clam (2011), an inviting metal vagina, it provides an exclamation mark to the enduring obsession with sexuality in contemporary human society.

Erik Madigan Heck with 'Felicity Brown and the End of Spring'

July 26, 2011 by Kay

Here is a series of photographs and watercolour paintings by the New York-based artist Erik Madigan Heck, featuring the Spring Summer 2011 collection of young British fashion designer Felicity Brown. The images are the first look at Erik’s upcoming print title ‘January to August’.

www.maisondesprit.com www.nomenusquarterly.com www.ablogcuratedby.com www.felicitybrown.com

Paintings, Prints, Sculptures - Charming Baker

July 25, 2011 by Kay

For more information, click here.

PHOTO: Hirst Skateboards at Public Domaine

July 22, 2011 by Kay

With Public domaine – Skateboard culture, “skateboarding” expresses itself in full freedom through all of la Gaîté lyrique’s spaces via the various artistic spheres that it influences: music, graphics, cinema, photography, fashion, video games… Public domaine – Skateboard culture gives voice to those who have forged themselves uncommon lives after being touched by the skateboard. Until Sunday 7th August 2011.

Damien Hirst’s skateboards will be on display from 1st July 2011 but will not be available to purchase at the exhibition, so if you are interested please click here to view all the skateboards available directly from Other Criteria.

Damien Hirst in New Zealand

July 21, 2011 by Kay

Damien Hirst: The Dead and The Souls Gow Langsford Gallery 20 July - 27 August 2011

Infamous for his wealth, celebrity and his record-breaking, bank-breaking auction prices, Damien Hirst has become somewhat the poster boy for British Art of his era. Rarely shown in this country, Auckland audiences will be treated to an exhibition of his work at Gow Langsford Gallery this winter. Although it may be difficult not to mention money when talking about Hirst, the exhibition The Dead and The Souls brings together a selection of editioned works, as well as some impressive originals, which will appeal to those with pockets shallower than Charles Saatchi's.

The two bodies of editioned work on show, The Dead (2009) and The Souls (2010) envelop several of Hirst's well known concerns; death and life, beauty and desire with a dynamism typical of Hirst's work. The consecutive series are each made up of a few compositions in various colour-ways and each print is in an edition of only fifteen. In The Souls butterflies, as symbols for both the beauty of life and its impermanence, become metaphors for faith and death, while the skull imagery in The Dead make overt reference to mortality. Laid out like museum specimens and more or less anatomically correct Hirst has beautified his subjects through the use of block foil printing. "Of The Souls Hirst has said: I love butterflies because when they are dead they look alive. The foil block makes the butterflies have a feel similar to the actual butterflies in the way that they reflect the light. After The Dead I had to do the butterflies because you can't have one without the other". [Bracewell, M. (2010)]

The mass of imagery and scintillating colour creates spectacle, perhaps inevitable for Hirst, while collectively these works remind us of his power as an image maker and his enduring ability to captivate his audience.

As well as the two collections above we will be showcasing several of Hirst's sculptural Spin Skull works, three butterfly paintings and the impressive original, Beautiful Apollo Idealisation Painting.

Ali Ikram takes a look at our Damien Hirst exhibition on TV3's Nightline. View the video here.

Marcus Bastel: But Where Are All The People

July 20, 2011 by Georgia

Aubin & Wills

188 Westbourne Grove

London W11 2RH

Private view: 21 July 7.30pm - 9pm

Fascinated by the overwhelming spaciousness of the American Southwest, Marcus Bastel uses his photography to capture fragments of the wide-stretched, rugged landscapes this territory has to offer. His images encapsulate the man-made as well as the natural environment, but they never include any inhabitants or passers-by. They are tranquil shots of a deserted world, with the invisible photographer as the only evidence of an existing human being.

Bastel's photographs are fragments, parts of larger stories like film stills. He says: "What is important for me is that a viewer can imagine there to be a story around the frame that is being presented. And for me to take the picture I need to be able to see that there is the potential to be a story. Like a stage set without the actors."

Bastel gives the viewer the freedom to write the script, and to let their mind wonder across these empty fields, providing a possibillity to escape, to daydream and to wander off into the wild, wild West.

Marcus Bastel is being represented by Anoukh Foerg Literary Agency in Munich and his photography is with Gallery Stock and Millennium Images. His book ‘But where are all the people’ has won Honorable Mention in the Photography Book Now International Juried Competition 2011 (PBN). To view more of the artist's work, visit his website.

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