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Tim Noble & Sue Webster's 'dick and slit' sculptures explore relationship dynamics & self-image via… https://t.co/5PrVXbWesN
4 days ago

Beautiful collaboration between artist Eduardo Sarabia and @deltoroshoes https://t.co/0SuMQ5AWsi https://t.co/USBAfRzC1r
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Last Day at @LAArtShow – see some pictures of our booth here: https://t.co/3O5aB7WaW8 https://t.co/vHyvPbtooZ
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Hard as Fuck: #HarlandMiller new release on show @LAArtShow. Our booth also features works by #JohnHoylandhttps://t.co/ck2StJLIfv
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@RobSawyerUK Thank you. More pictures to come but you can see the work here: https://t.co/nfkmhzfVFb
2 weeks ago

.@LAArtShow opens to the public today – join us booth 312 to discover works by #DamienHirst #HarlandMiller &more!… https://t.co/j6xYvJw8X6
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Works by Gavin Turk and Wolfe von Lenkiewicz will be on show at @GalleryGriffin from 12th Jan – 24th Feb 2017… https://t.co/eyicG3U514
2 weeks ago

Rothko in Britain

September 29, 2011 by Georgia

Whitechapel Gallery
9 September - 26 February 2011
Admission free

In 1961 the Whitechapel Gallery held the first solo show of American artist Mark Rothko in Britain. This landmark exhibition is brought vividly to life through the Gallery's archives of original photographs, letters from the artist and new recordings of visitor's memories presented alongside Rothko's painting Light Red Over Black (1957).

Mark Rothko (1903–1970) was part of a generation of American painters whose style became known as Abstract Expressionism. From the 1950s he used muted colours to make luminous rectangles seemingly hover on the surface of the canvas. While realising his Whitechapel Gallery exhibition he outlined precise instructions of how he wanted his work to be displayed, such as the lighting levels and hanging height of paintings. All this created an immersive experience for the viewer. Reviewing the show in The New Statesman art critic David Sylvester wrote, ‘Faced with Rothko’s paintings at Whitechapel, one feels oneself unbearably hemmed-in by forces buffeting one’s every nerve’

The display sheds new light on Rothko’s connection with Britain, highlighting the strong relationships he formed during his trip in the summer of 1959 and an era of dialogue between British and American artists.