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Eduardo Sarabia at Museo Tamayo

July 29, 2016 by Mary

Ceramics have been used by different cultures over time, among other things, as a narrative tool. In the work of Eduardo Sarabia, ceramics has become one of the mainstays for interweaving traditional elements, with issues such as social and natural survival, and activities that intersect with illicit economies. Thus, different types of motion, flow, and exchange that are intertwined in everyday cultural processes are announced by his work.

Eduardo-Sarabia-at-Museo-Tamayo

Eduardo Sarabia, 2016, courtesy of the artist

"Eduardo Sarabia: Feathered Serpent and other festivities" is the latest installation conceived by the artist from a personal fascination for the quetzal. In pursuit of this bird, ancestrally surrounded by countless myths, Sarabia made a trip to the Biosphere del Triunfo, in Chiapas, where from exchanges with local passed through his hands a pen quetzal from the black market. Taking this and other experiences that unfolded from that point, Sarabia's project poses a tribute to feather art. The known Penacho de Moctezuma was made not only with quetzal feathers but also with feathers of the other three birds contained in this celebration: Blue cotinga, squirrel cuckoo, spatula pink.

The top of a ceiba – sacred tree for cultures prehispanic, commonly planted in the streets of their cities – was, according to one of the legends of the Popol Vuh, a dwelling for the gods who lived as quetzal. Ceiba trees, framed as different times throughout the facility, introduced the dance of spiritual characters, deities masked, concerning political parties and some objects more, referring to new mythologies and rituals around the lair of these birds. "Feathered Serpent and other festivities" is a suggestive montage of possible paths and border economies around a taxidermy collection that bring together about 300 birds endangered species, including the quetzal.

From 30 July, 2016
Museo Tamayo
Paseo de la Reforma 51, Bosque de Chapultepec, Mexico City