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Other Criteria is at @expochicago booth 911 until Sunday 25 September https://t.co/6vPWmnu7mh #DamienHirsthttps://t.co/ugzRqlGSwG
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Rachel Howard's largest solo exhibition in Italy opens at Macro Testaccio #Roma https://t.co/rG56sAbqYU https://t.co/WZx6VNmFPW
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Adam Dix’s exhibition ‘All Are Welcome’ will be running at @elevenfineart from 23 September to 29 October 2016.… https://t.co/kDf5CAeMhA
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Other Criteria will be @expochicago Sep. 22-25, booth 451 #DamienHirst #HarlandMiller https://t.co/CKsLLf9s3i https://t.co/Rl038tlC4o
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Michael Joo exhibition: 'Barrier Island' @SCADdotedu https://t.co/6f1MpvqTRF
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A Selection of Works to Draw your Autumn #drawing #TomOrmond https://t.co/BI69ImNPGO https://t.co/Z41YVfRCDq
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Photos: Other Criteria at EXPO Chicago 2016

September 24, 2016 by Mary

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Rachel Howard's largest solo exhibition in Italy opens at Macro Testaccio

September 21, 2016 by Mary

Rachel Howard’s largest major solo exhibition in Rome opens on the 22 September at MACRO Testaccio.

The exhibition will be housed in the museum’s Testaccio building, a former slaughterhouse. The centre space will be occupied by Howard’s Paintings of Violence (Why I am not a mere Christian), an installation of ten paintings and one sculpture. Created over a period of five years from 2011 – 2016, Howard continues her examination of religion, mortality and violence, specifically ‘controlled violence’, meticulously planned and calmly executed. The title is taken from two opposing polemics, Why I Am Not a Christian by Bertrand Russell and Mere Christianity by C.S. Lewis.

More of Howard’s new and recent paintings that explore pattern and the grid, are exhibited in galleries either side of the main space. These paintings explore the idiosyncratic qualities of oil paint, unpicking the accepted rules of engagement with this most traditional of mediums. In the large-scale canvases, Symptoms and Side Effects, (2016) and Wood for Trees, (2016) an interchange between background and foreground is specifically explored. She describes her aim, ‘to bring the decorative forward, to give it a life of its own, to play with pattern as perhaps reflecting a mental interior as well as a literal interior’. These paintings alongside the grid paintings explore ideas of order and entropy.

The exhibition was made possible thanks to the generous support of the Bohen Foundation. A publication on the Paintings of Violence will be published later this month. The Paintings of Violence will travel to the MASS MoCA as a solo presentation, in 2017.

22nd September – 18th October, 2016
Macro Testaccio, Padiglione 9B, Piazza O. Giustiniani 4, 00153 Roma

Adam Dix: All Are Welcome

September 20, 2016 by Mary

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Adam Dix: The Puppet, 2015
Ink, fluorescent pigment and oil on canvas
67 x 51 in / 170 x 130 cm

‘Social networking captures the techno-chic of the moment, but for all its glitz as the latest new technology to bind, bond and communicate, the principles it enshrines originate deep in our evolutionary past’. Clive Gamble from Thinking Big

Eleven is pleased to present new paintings by Adam Dix in ‘All Are Welcome’. Dix distills the social origins of communication through religion, folklore and national pageantry. He investigates the collective consciousness of past and present societies, exploring how we utilise social systems to create unity with one another.

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Adam Dix: Inauguration, 2015
Ink, fluorescent pigment and oil on canvas
51 x 67 in / 130 x 170 cm

‘All Are Welcome’ refers to unification through both traditional and contemporary ways of connecting. Traditional realms for networking within communities may have developed at a church or village green, acting as a stage where the community physically comes together to strengthen common ideals. Modern societies’ methods of connecting have shifted towards creating a unifying experience through our screens. We are homogenised and alone together. However symbolically, the ways we have evolved to communicate offer us the same sense of belonging.

Dix’s paintings explore the many strata of connecting through bringing the past and present forms of communication together. ‘Puppet’ (2015) depicts a communication mast appropriated as a processional effigy, which acts as a unifying event. He expresses togetherness using symbols from both past and present ideas of European folk custom, performance and festival.

Dix’s palette of muted colours and hazy imagery root each work in a time of historical optimism. He references the imagined futures of our predecessors through his use of colour, linking the subject of contemporary technology toits 1950s origins. He applies numerous washes of ink and oil to build up the colours and imagery in each work. His process demands conscientiousness and precision, as once a colour is laid on to the surface it can’t be changed.

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Adam Dix: Black Mirror, 2016
Ink and oil on canvas
35 x 51 in / 90 x 130 cm

Adam Dix was born in 1967 and lives and works in London. His work has been featured in exhibitions including: Jerwood Drawing Prize, Jerwood Space, London (2013) Yesterday’s Prophets, Eleven, London (2013), The Future Can Wait, London (2011 and 2012), Fratenise – The Salon, Beaconsfield, London (2011), and Transmission, Haunch of Venison, London (2010). His work is also part of prestigious collections including the Royal Collection of Monaco and the Zabludowicz Collection, London.

Installation shots

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Installation shots

23rd September to 29th October 2016
Eleven Gallery, 11 Eccleston Street, London SW1W 9LX

Other Criteria at EXPO CHICAGO 2016, booth 911

September 15, 2016 by Mary

EXPO CHICAGO, the International Exposition of Contemporary & Modern Art, opens the fall art season each September at historic Navy Pier. Entering its fifth edition in 2016, EXPO CHICAGO presents artwork from 140 leading galleries from around the world, and includes EXPOSURE — a section that affords younger galleries the opportunity to participate in a major international art fair. EXPOSURE provides critical opportunities for curators, collectors, and art patrons to survey the best in innovative and emerging programs.

Under the leadership of President and Director Tony Karman, EXPO CHICAGO draws upon the city’s rich history as a vibrant international cultural destination, while highlighting the region’s contemporary arts community and inspiring its collector base. 

Other Criteria will show new works by artists Rachel Howard, Harland Miller and Polly Morgan. Our booth will also feature works by Damien Hirst and John Hoyland.

Vernissage, the opening night preview benefiting the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, takes place Thursday, September 22, 6 – 9 p.m.
General Admission: September 23 & 24, 11am–7pm and September 25, 11am–6pm

Navy Pier, 600 E Grand Ave, Chicago

Damien Hirst at the National Gallery of Art, Washington

August 15, 2016 by Mary

The Last Supper (1990), a series of 13 monumental prints by British artist Damien Hirst, was acquired by the National Gallery of Art from the Corcoran Gallery of Art in 2015. Hirst was among the most prominent of the Young British Artists—or YBAs, as they are known—who revitalized the British art scene in the 1990s. In The Last Supper, he wittily explores the role of faith, viewing it in relation to art, medicine, and religion. Never before shown in Washington in its entirety, the visually arresting Last Supper series will be installed in the West Building Concourse Gallery from August 13, 2016, through January 1, 2017.

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Damien Hirst, "Chicken," 1999, screenprint
National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (Gift of The Heather and Tony Podesta Collection, Washington, DC)

The 13 prints that make up The Last Supper refer to the number gathered at the biblical Last Supper. Hirst raises the question of whether our faith in medicine, with its promise to stave off disease and death, is now comparable to our faith in religion. He conflates minimalist pharmaceutical packaging with the form and style of art, wondering "why some people believe completely in medicine and not in art, without questioning either." Hirst recalls watching his mother fill a prescription at a pharmacy, taking note of how at ease she was with the visual motifs used to market drugs. "My mum was looking at the same kind of stuff in the chemist's and believing in it completely. And then, when looking at it in an art gallery, completely not believing in it."

Each of the Last Supper prints features a pharmaceutical label that has been altered. The names of medicines have been replaced with those of common British foods ("Ethambutol Hydrochloride" becomes "Steak and Kidney," for example) and the names or logos of the manufacturers have been replaced by those of the artist—Hirst's own brand, so to speak. Enlarged to a heroic scale, the prints pose the question of whether pharmaceuticals—a staple of many contemporary diets—may have become not only the salvation in which we put our faith, but our daily bread.

The Last Supper
From August 13, 2016 – January 1, 2017
National Gallery of Art, 6th Street and Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC 

Photos: Other Criteria at Seattle Art Fair 2016

August 9, 2016 by Mary

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Eduardo Sarabia at Museo Tamayo

July 29, 2016 by Mary

Ceramics have been used by different cultures over time, among other things, as a narrative tool. In the work of Eduardo Sarabia, ceramics has become one of the mainstays for interweaving traditional elements, with issues such as social and natural survival, and activities that intersect with illicit economies. Thus, different types of motion, flow, and exchange that are intertwined in everyday cultural processes are announced by his work.

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Eduardo Sarabia, 2016, courtesy of the artist

"Eduardo Sarabia: Feathered Serpent and other festivities" is the latest installation conceived by the artist from a personal fascination for the quetzal. In pursuit of this bird, ancestrally surrounded by countless myths, Sarabia made a trip to the Biosphere del Triunfo, in Chiapas, where from exchanges with local passed through his hands a pen quetzal from the black market. Taking this and other experiences that unfolded from that point, Sarabia's project poses a tribute to feather art. The known Penacho de Moctezuma was made not only with quetzal feathers but also with feathers of the other three birds contained in this celebration: Blue cotinga, squirrel cuckoo, spatula pink.

The top of a ceiba – sacred tree for cultures prehispanic, commonly planted in the streets of their cities – was, according to one of the legends of the Popol Vuh, a dwelling for the gods who lived as quetzal. Ceiba trees, framed as different times throughout the facility, introduced the dance of spiritual characters, deities masked, concerning political parties and some objects more, referring to new mythologies and rituals around the lair of these birds. "Feathered Serpent and other festivities" is a suggestive montage of possible paths and border economies around a taxidermy collection that bring together about 300 birds endangered species, including the quetzal.

From 30 July, 2016
Museo Tamayo
Paseo de la Reforma 51, Bosque de Chapultepec, Mexico City

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