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Photos: Other Criteria at Market Art + Design Hamptons

July 9, 2017 by Mary

Harland Miller: One Bar Electric Memoir

July 7, 2017 by Mary

White Cube presents an exhibition of new work by Harland Miller at Mason’s Yard. ‘One Bar Electric Memoir’ includes two series of paintings that continue and expand Miller’s investigation into the relationship between viewer, text and image.

The first series of large-scale works draws on Miller’s extensive archive of psychology and social science books, which date from the 1960s and ‘70s. Characterised by their bold and colourful abstract covers, these books embraced a positive attitude and the possibility of ‘fixing’ disorders through a process of self-help. The geometric cover designs not only drew parallels with contemporary abstract painting but also provided a foil to the darker aspects of social neurosis addressed by the books’ content. As Miller has commented, they hail ‘from that very particular, positive, post-war era when information was being made more available and being hungered for, too. It was often practical and pre-jargon and to do with fixing things – fixing society, fixing yourself...’.

In Miller’s paintings, three-dimensional architectonic forms in bright, pop colours float against solid saturated backgrounds and are paired with fictional, sardonically humorous titles such as Reverse Psychology Isn’t Working (2017) and Immediate Relief... Coming Soon(2017). Occasionally, the same title appears on different compositions, highlighting how colour, form and context can change both the rhythm and meaning of words. Similar to the titles, Miller’s abstract imagery can also be read in different ways. Commenting on the work Armageddon – Is It Too Much To Ask? (2017), for example, he says: ‘It’s an image that you see one way – then, when you relax, it flips and, no matter how hard you try, you can’t see it the original way. It’s symbolic of the way you read the title.’ These works reflect a departure for the artist, whose previous series of Penguin paperback paintings were re-appropriations of an existing object. Here, for the first time, Miller creates his own designs, focusing more closely on the impact of the image itself.

In another series of fictional book cover paintings, Miller depicts the outlines of letters in a range of typefaces and colours, intersected or layered over each other to create short, enigmatic words such as ‘Up’ or ‘If’. Through a process of isolation, overlaying and re-connecting, Miller creates a sense of depth in the image that deconstructs and abstracts the meaning of language itself. With their bold, saturated colours, these paintings reference American abstraction and, in particular, Robert Rauschenberg and Ed Ruscha’s use of vernacular signage and motifs. Miller has said about this series: ‘The idea is to make paintings that are just words, in contrast to the titles of previous works’.

Harland-Miller-One-Bar-Electric-Memoir-at-White-Cube

In both series of paintings, the artist continues to use his own name as author. While the presence of Miller’s name alludes to the actual authorship of both image and text, fact and fiction become blurred, allowing for the artist’s deadpan humour to provoke, question and draw attention to the context and content of each work.

7 July – 9 September 2017

White Cube, 25-26 Masons Yard, St. James's, London SW1Y 6BU

Other Criteria at Art Cat Boot Fair 2017

July 4, 2017 by Mary

2017 is the year the Art Car boot fair gets a re-boot with our theme The Original. The fair began in 2004 with the intention of gently kicking against the increasing commercialisation of the postSaatchi /Frieze London art market back then and creating a more anarchic marketplace where like-minded artists could have some fun with their work, try out some new ideas and barter directly with their audience. It has taken place in a car park just off Brick Lane since 2004 and in that time, has featured literally hundreds of artists from Turner Prize winners to students, kids and lately the cream of the urban art scene. 2017 is the year the boot fair gets a re-boot with a fabulous new venue right in the heart of Vauxhall’s new gallery district, flanked by Newport Street Gallery and Beaconsfield with Cabinet Gallery and Gasworks down the road.

Expect lots of serious art bargains as always, boots of originals, every artist listed will be present, plus there will be masses of frivolous goings-on, less endless ‘limited editions’ and more of the art world really letting its hair down and trying out new things for an engaged, fun and art-loving crowd.

In collaboration with Newport Street Gallery, Other Criteria will host a selection of artists at The Art Car Boot Fair, selling unique works and holding book signings throughout the day. Including Harland MillerMustafa HulusiHelen BeardPhillip AllenMarcus Harvey & Rachel Howard.

THE WORKSHOP
26 Lambeth High Street
London SE1 7AG

Sunday 9th of July 2017
12 – 6 pm

At Market Art + Design Hamptons, booth 411

June 27, 2017 by Mary

Market Art + Design returns to the centre of Bridgehampton this July 6th through 9th for its seventh edition, with compelling presentations of modern and contemporary art enhanced by a striking design component pulling from dealers and designers from around the world. Expanding this year to accommodate close to seventy exhibitors, Market Art + Design 2017 will be the East End’s premier art fair and the summer season’s top destination for fine art and design.

Other Criteria will feature a brand new Harland Miller unique hand-finished print as well as a selection of works by Damien Hirst including his latest print series ‘Eat the Rich’.

VIP: Thursday, July 6, 2017 – 6:00pm to 10:00pm
General Hours:
Friday, July 7, 2017 - 12:00pm to 8:00pm
Saturday, July 8, 2017 - 11:00pm to 7:00pm
Sunday, July 9, 2017 - 12:00pm to 6:00pm

The Bridgehampton Museum
2368 Montauk Highway
Bridgehampton, NY

For complimentary tickets, email newyork@othercriteria.com

Gonzalo Lebrija at MAZ Museo de Arte de Zapopan

June 20, 2017 by Mary

Eduardo Abaroa, Miguel Andrade Valdez. Julieta Aranda. Iván Argote, Diego Berruecos, Stefan Benchoam / Byron Mármol, Marcelo Cidade, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Jose Dávila, Helen Escobedo / Paolo Gori, Radamés “Juni” Figueroa / Melvin Laz, Mathias Goeritz, Alejandro de la Guerra, Cynthia Gutiérrez, Pablo Helguera, Juan Fernando Herrán, Ximena Labra, Runo Lagomarsino,  Gonzalo Lebrija, Anuar Maauad, José Carlos Martinat, Pedro Meyer, Mario Navarro, Amalia Pica, Claudia Rodríguez, Ruta de la Amistad, Guillermo Santamarina / Colectivo Sector Reforma, Luis Miguel Suro, Tercerunquinto, Emanuel Tovar y Adrián Villar Rojas

The result of an examination of public sculpture and urban monuments, the exhibition Monumentos, anti-monumentos y nueva escultura pública surveys contemporary artistic practices in Mexico and Latin America that question the idea of public sculptures, monuments, and memorials, inviting viewers to rethink the issues connected with both the real and the symbolic occupation of public space.

The exhibition is divided into three sections. First, there is a photographic archive of Mexican monuments assembled by Helen Escobedo and Paolo Gori in the 1980s, which includes images of public sculptures all over Mexico. The collection contains motifs that have come to be a part of Mexico’s national identity busts of heroes, allegorical representations of the nation, reinterpretations of pre-Hispanic history–but also includes sculptures of wider imaginative scope, such as a monument to the snail, and others to aspects of everyday life.

The second section presents historical material related to the international project organised by Mathias Goeritz for the 1968 Olympic Games: The Route of Friendship, a series of monumental abstract sculptures installed in the vicinity of the various sporting venues, which involved the participation of twenty-two artists of different nationalities. These works are still preserved in Mexico City.

The exhibition continues with the work of contemporary artists who have dealt with these same themes. The roles played by political figures in dictatorships and authoritarian regimes, the commemoration of tragedies, and collective histories are documented through photography, videos, installations, and monumental sculptures that question the very nature of the format.

The project invites reflection on various pressing issues. What constitutes public space and who is authorised to use it? Is the erection of monuments an effective strategy for building an identity? Is public art a mechanism for the construction of ideologies? What possibilities are offered by contemporary art in our cities to engage us responsibly with public space, as agents and not just as spectators?

  • MAZ Museo de Arte de Zapopan
    Andador 20 de Noviembre 166, Zapopan, Mexico


From 31 March until 30th July, 2017

Rachel Howard at Galería Pelaires

June 8, 2017 by Mary

Galería Pelaires is delighted to present Gregor Hildebrandt, Rachel Howard and Idris Khan on the occasion of Art Palma Summer. Conceptualised by Ashwin Thadani and Fedreric Pinya, the group exhibition highlights a contemporary fascination with matter, particularly with lines, and a mutual effect arising from it: an aesthetic dialogue through and with contemporary art. The works of Hildebrandt, Howard and Khan are all abstract and minimal in their own way, challenging the notion of contemporary painting by differing material and techniques. They are capable of reflecting the moods that persisted while being created and of sensually conveying them to the viewer.

What we encounter in and with the works of Hildebrandt, Howard and Khan are differing surfaces creating a mutual effect: they invite us to immerse into their depth, thereby aiming to dissolve the distance between viewer, artist and image. Although referring to his or her individual sources of art historical, philosophical or musical inspirations (to name but a few: Hildebrandt is currently inspired by the Brazilian singer-songwriter Toco; Howard is drawn to Utagawa Kuniyoashi, a Japanese printmaker of the late 18th century; and Khan - quite literally - reacts to the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche and his book “The Birth of Tragedy”), their strongest commonality is the peculiar capability to visually depict and mentally evoke an intense mobile boundlessness that spreads over the four corners of the image. In this over- powering moment of experiencing human emotions, embodied in-between lines of paint, vinyl and words, the viewer is confronted with the experience of the sublime. 

Rachel Howard’s approach to creating a contemporary painting is based on oil paint and canvas. We see differently sized colour fields that are sharply intersected by lines and sometimes patterns. At a closer look, Howard’s surfaces possess a three-dimensional – if not architectural – quality, achieved through an intensive experimentation with oil paint and other matter that encourages it to spreads over the canvas. Her signature feature is the use of gravity as an invisible paintbrush, creating lines that seem to contain a large spectrum of formal behaviour: they may end in delicate grids, form abstract patterns and shapes that occasionally allude to landscapes. Even in her more figurative works, the lines are still present, often traversing or even carrying the contours of the painted figure.

Rachel Howard: Undone, 2017
Oil on linen, 91.44 x 76.2 cm 

Howard once described her artistic practice close to that of an alchemist, constantly trying to apprehend the transmutability of matters. Her painted surfaces are, in fact, often literally disrupted, resembling the remains of a physical experiment. It is the artist’s longstanding preoccupation with the behaviour of oil paint when mixing it with diverse substances, as well as her on-going interest in the progression of lines that leaves such alchemistic traces on her canvases. The resulting line patterns not only convey Howard’s behavioural studies on matter and form. Moreover, they also invite the viewer to immerse into the painting to experience a certain calmness of the mind –supported by a stable scaffolding of lines. 

2nd June – 13th September 2007

PELAIRES CENTRE CULTURAL CONTEMPORANI

C. Can Verí, 3
07001 Palma de Mallorca

Mat Collishaw: Thresholds

May 16, 2017 by Mary

Mat Collishaw is restaging one of the world's first major exhibitions of photography for his forthcoming exhibition, Thresholds. The artist has created a virtual reality artwork that will reference the world-changing innovations of early photography and provide a window into parts of our cultural heritage that can no longer be accessed.

Mat-Collishaw-Thresholds-at-the-Somerset-House-London

To recreate the 1839 exhibition, the artist has collaborated with a host of experts including VR specialists, architectural historians and world experts on photography to produce an experience that delivers multiple levels of reality. Through both a VR engine and an actual room with tangible objects, the physical experience will be seamlessly synchronised with what is seen in the VR headsets. The result is that visitors will be able to walk freely and untethered around the exhibit, with the ability to actually touch displays and even feel other sensations such as heat from a fireplace.

Collishaw said of the exhibition, ‘I have been looking to work with virtual reality for a number of years and it has now become a feasible medium for me to use in an artwork. VR’s ability to enable visitors to revisit the birth of photography – a medium that has come to saturate our lives – is uncanny and compelling. It’s also quite appropriate as VR is the total 360-degree immersion of a subject within an image, and is itself one of the many innovations spawned by the invention of photography.’

THRESHOLDS opens at Photo London on 18 May and will be on view at Somerset House until 11 June 2017.

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