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Philip Allen, Fabio Tiboni Gallery, Bologna

April 30, 2010 by Ellie

Phillip Allen – Roger Kelly 30th April - 15th July 2010

Fabio Tiboni Gallery, Bologna, Italy

PRESS RELEASE: British painting has achieved remarkable strength in the first decade of the new century. That strength has come partly from the determination of painters to drive their medium forward through institutionalised scepticism about the desirability of its survival at the top table of artistic discourse, and partly from a new enthusiasm among artists of a certain age and maturity for the wonder of paint as material and the stuff of creativity.

Phillip Allen and Roger Kelly are proponents of painting. Having passed through with cool minds the hot-headed frenzy of expectation that the overheated community of writers, collectors and curators have insinuated upon recent graduates, they are making the best work of their lives in their late thirties and into their forties.

Phillip Allen duels with the concept of originality, observing creativity as a synthesis of what may already exist, a situation he intensifies with versions of his own work that perpetrate altered perspectives on a known motif. He has developed an idiosyncratic language of divergent textures, patterns and shapes reminiscent of cartoon imagery. He paints in terms that are blunt and sharp at the same time, capable of transporting notions of sophistication and of just passing the time.

Kelly approaches the blank ground (in his case unstretched canvas pinned to his studio wall) through a process carried out almost entirely in black and white. He constructs a loosely pictorial area from images assembled from an array of sources (his own photographs, magazines, other art) that is manipulated by cutting, collaging, reducing and drawing, copying, enlarging and transferring.

Neither painter can be described as abstract. For both, ‘pictoriality’ is a relevant concept while narrative remains a valid possibility. Allen has little time for the distinctions between ‘non-objective’ and ‘representational’ (and the salami-slicing of gradations between the two). He effectively straddles both poles in his attempt to make painting that interests him. Kelly, it seems, is more aware of these categories. For him they calibrate an aesthetic scale; it is not one of quality or value but of volume, intensity and intimacy.

Their affiliations are made known through their work. The viewer’s gaze is greeted with a spectrum of enquiries: some assent to convention while others, the majority, complicate it, subvert expectations and propose insistent arguments for another way of looking. Looking so real that it strains the eye and stains memory. Looking that raises questions that spill through that membrane into how the world beyond gets lived.

Martin Holman, March 2010

Damien Hirst & Michael Joo

April 28, 2010 by Ellie

As a reminder, Haunch of Venison Berlin opens 'Have You Ever Really Looked at the Sun?', a joint exhibition by Michael Joo and Damien Hirst from this Saturday until August 2010.

'Have You Ever Really Looked at the Sun?' is a unique collaboration between the two artists, who met in Cologne in 1991 and have remained close friends since that time. Engaged in a continuous, twenty-year discourse about their individual artistic practices, this marks the first time Joo and Hirst have worked together to realise a full-scale joint exhibition. 'Have You Ever Really Looked at the Sun? 'will feature new, especially conceived sculptures and installations, as well as seminal paintings and sculptures from Joo and Hirst.

A publication will be on sale to mark the exhibition. Keep an eye on the blog and website!

hirst joo hyerlats

Michael Craig-Martin in conversation

April 27, 2010 by Ellie

Wednesday 19th May 2010 at 6pm. No booking required.

Lecture Theatre 2, Academic Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford

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Michael Craig-Martin will be in conversation with Michael Stanley, Director of Modern Art Oxford|, to talk about his major new wall painting for the atrium of the Children's Hospital and West Wing at the John Radcliffe Hospital. The wall painting, which extends over five storeys, will be one of the largest artworks Michael has executed in this country and has been paid for entirely through charitable donations made specifically for this purpose.

This giant painting, which was completed at the end of April 2010, is sited in the busy entrance to the West Wing and Children's Hospital and will be seen by tens of thousands of patients, visitors and staff each year. Due to the fact that the children's cancer ward looks on to the atrium, it will also transform the lives of children who often spend weeks restricted to isolation rooms while receiving treatment.

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Michael Craig-Martin said:

'My principle aim has been to transform the bleak view from the windows of the children's wards facing into the atrium. The great height of the wall opposite has made it possible to create an image of immense scale, a highly coloured interplay of objects and giant letters spelling KIDS. I hope it will create a sense of pleasure and wonderment and act as a stimulus to the imagination of all, but particularly for those children confined to the wards, the only place where it will be possible to see the painting properly, at eye level and head-on.'

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This major project has been funded entirely by private donation, spearheaded by a major donor for the Children's Hospital who initiated the project. For the past 20 years the Oxford Radcliffe Hospitals Trust (ORH) has been involved in commissioning artists, purchasing artwork and programming arts activity across its three hospital sites to create a positive and uplifting environment for its staff, patients and visitors. Its aims, amongst several, are to create a welcoming and relaxing environment for patients and visitors that reflects the Trust’s patient-centred care; to build public understanding and awareness of medical science research through arts/science collaborations and to distract and engage patients and visitors to reduce stress and anxiety and provide motivation for patients to get up and about after treatment.

Recent arts projects taken on by ORH include an award-winning arts programme for the new Oxford Cancer Centre consisting of 6 major commissions integrated into the architecture of the new building, over 250 works of arts for corridors and patient rooms, and specially commissioned artworks and furniture for terraces and gardens as well as the hanging of original paintings, photographs and prints for all single rooms in the West Wing by artists living and working in Oxfordshire, chosen through open selection. For more information on their work or to get involved, email Ruth Charity.

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Sarah Lucas joins The British Art Show 2010

April 27, 2010 by Ellie

Participating artist Steven Claydon’s The components of Hubris (2006)Participating artist Steven Claydon’s The components of Hubris (2006).

The British Art Show, which is staged every 5 years, is to be curated this year by Tom Morton and Lisa Lefeuvre and organised by the Hayward Gallery. Marking the seventh edition of the exhibition, the show will be subtitled 'In the days of the comet' and will open in Nottingham in October, after which it will travel to the Hayward Gallery, London, Glasgow and Plymouth.

In Nottingham the show will open over three venues: Nottingham Contemporary, the New Art Exchange, and Nottingham Castle Museum. Following its appearance at the Hayward Gallery in London, it will then travel to Glasgow (the CCA and Tramway Gallery) and then to Plymouth, where it will be spread over Plymouth Arts Centre, The Plymouth Museum and Art Gallery and Peninsula Arts. The work on show will include sculpture, painting, installation, photography, film, drawing, video and performance.

This year's 39 selected artists have been chosen on the grounds of their "significant contribution to contemporary art in the last five years". They include: Charles Avery, Karla Black, Becky Beasley, Juliette Blightman, Duncan Campbell, Varda Caivano, Spartacus Chetwynd, Steven Claydon, Cullinan Richards, Matthew Darbyshire, Milena Dragicevic, Luke Fowler, Michael Fullerton, Alasdair Gray, Brian Griffiths, Roger Hiorns, Ian Kiaer, Anja Kirschner & David Panos, Sarah Lucas, Christian Marclay, Simon Martin, Nathaniel Mellors, Haroon Mirza, David Noonan, The Otolith Group, Mick Peter, Gail Pickering, Olivia Plender, Elizabeth Price, Karin Ruggaber, Edgar Schmitz, Maaike Schoorel, George Shaw, Wolfgang Tillmans, Sue Tompkins, Phoebe Unwin, Tris Vonna-Michell, Emily Wardill, Keith Wilson.

Tom Morton and Lisa Lefeuvre said: “We are delighted to have been selected by Hayward Touring and the participating venues to curate The British Art Show 7. Building on the excellent work of British Art Show 6 curators Alex Farquharson and Andrea Schlieker, we hope to explore and expand the possibilities of what a large scale ‘time and place’ exhibition might be, at a moment when urgent new voices in British art are making themselves heard.” And of their title, "Our subtitle is taken from HG Wells' 1906 science fiction novel In the Days of the Comet.

"We are interested in the recurrent nature of the comet as a symbol of how each version of the present collides with the past and the future and the work of the artists in British Art Show 7, in many different ways, contest assumptions of how 'the now' might be understood."

Ralph Rugoff, director of the Hayward Gallery, said that “the curatorial premise of the British Art Show 7 allows visitors the chance to discover younger artists, and also re-evaluate and reconnect with artists whose work they thought they were familiar with, but whose new developments hold many surprises."

The British Art Show 7 will open at Nottingham Contemporary on 23 October, before moving to the Hayward Gallery, in London, on 14 February 2011.

It will be at Glasgow Centre for Contemporary Art between May and August 2011, and at Plymouth Arts Centre from September until December.

YBA Group Show, Berlin

April 27, 2010 by Ellie

Michael Craig-Martin, ART (red), 2010, 122 x 122cm, acrylic on aluminium. © The artist, Courtesy Gagosian GalleryMichael Craig-Martin, ART (red), 2010, 122 x 122cm, acrylic on aluminium. © The artist, Courtesy Gagosian Gallery

Opening 30th April 2010, 6-8pm

Coinciding with Berlin’s Gallery Weekend (30th April – 2nd May 2010) Galerie Haas & Fuchs are showing current works by 26 artists that all have one thing in common: they studied under Michael Craig-Martin at Goldsmiths College in London, and many still articulate the enormous influence of Craig-Martin on their artistic development. As an influential art lecturer and internationally acclaimed artist he has selected and brought together for Galerie Haas & Fuchs works by, amongst others, Damien Hirst, Glenn Brown, Sarah Lucas, Angus Fairhurst, Fiona Rae, Angela Bulloch, Julian Opie, Gary Hume and Thomas Demand.

Based upon the fundamentals learnt at Goldsmith’s, Craig-Martin’s former students all work in a variety of media, from painting to sculpture, photography, sound and installation as well as computer film. Their work is characterized both by austerity and concept, whilst also being incredibly sensory, physical and direct. Many works deal thematically with a fascination in pushing boundaries.

Sarah Lucas NUD (24), 2010, Tights, fluff, wire, 45 x 35 x 45 cm, Unique, Photo by Julian Simmons; © Sarah Lucas, Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, LondonSarah Lucas NUD (24), 2010, Tights, fluff, wire, 45 x 35 x 45 cm, Unique, Photo by Julian Simmons; © Sarah Lucas, Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London

The exhibition at Galerie Haas & Fuchs offers an impression of the current practice of the assembled artists: a medicine cabinet by Damien Hirst, a light based wall piece by Angela Bulloch, a minimal gloss on aluminum painting by Gary Hume. Julian Opie presents one of his recent computer generated animations, Sarah Lucas exhibits a body sculpture on a plinth and Fiona Rae shows one of her large abstract works on canvas.

Damien Hirst, In Search of Knowledge, 2007, Stainless steel and glass with plaster, metal and resin pills, 120.3 x 180.3 x 10.2 cm, Photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates © Damien Hirst. All rights reserved, DACS 2010Damien Hirst, In Search of Knowledge, 2007, Stainless steel and glass with plaster, metal and resin pills, 120.3 x 180.3 x 10.2 cm, Photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates © Damien Hirst. All rights reserved, DACS 2010

Participating artists:

Johannes Albers, Tony Bevan, Glenn Brown, Angela Bulloch, Mat Collishaw, Jessica Craig-Martin, Ian Davenport, Peter Davies, Thomas Demand, Angus Fairhurst, Liam Gillick, Mathew Hale, Damien Hirst, Paul Hosking, Gary Hume, Michael Landy, Abigail Lane, Sarah Lucas, Martin Maloney, Lisa Milroy, Julian Opie, Simon Patterson, Richard Patterson, Fiona Rae, Michael Raedecker, Michael Craig-Martin

A book with an essay by Michael Craig-Martin accompanies the exhibition.

Gary Hume, In the Underarm, 2010, Gloss paint on aluminium, 184 x 150 cm © the artist, Photo: Stephen WhiteGary Hume, In the Underarm, 2010, Gloss paint on aluminium, 184 x 150 cm © the artist, Photo: Stephen White

Wachstum, 2010, Stone, cardboard box, display, 167 x 67 x 60 cm, ©Johannes Albers. Photo by Marcus Schneidergrowth

Sarah Lucas at The Musuem of Cycladic Art

April 26, 2010 by Ellie

Nud Cycladic (16), 2010 Sarah Lucas. © Sarah Lucas,
Photography Julian Simmons, Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, LondonNud Cycladic (16), 2010 Sarah Lucas. © Sarah Lucas, Photography Julian Simmons, Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London

The Museum of Cycladic Art in Athens, Greece will host an exhibition from 12 May to 12 September with works by the British artist Sarah Lucas. It will be showing new work from the "Nuds" series, an important development in Lucas' work, a self-reflecting series that moves away from the gender-based critique of her work in the ‘90s and takes the earlier figurative "bunny" sculpture series to a more abstract form. There are interesting links to British sculpture in the 20th century, such as Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore, as well as influences by Louise Bourgeois, Bellmer and others. For more information, click here.

Cornucopia Installation Images

April 21, 2010 by Ellie

Below is a selection of installation shots from Damien Hirst's current exhibition, Cornucopia, at Musée Océanographique de Monaco. All images are © Damien Hirst. All rights reserved, DACS 2010 and Photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates.

To mark the exhibition, the artist produced a Silver Turtle in an edition of 35 + 5APs.

Away from the Flock, Divided, 1995, Lamb, steel, glass, silicone, acrylic
and formaldehyde solution, 46.46 x 73.23 x 20.2 in x 2 tanksAway from the Flock, Divided, 1995, Lamb, steel, glass, silicone, acrylic and formaldehyde solution, 46.46 x 73.23 x 20.2 in x 2 tanks

Beautiful Vertumnus Stream of Consciousness Painting, 2007,
Household gloss on canvas, 216 x 216 in

Beautiful Vertumnus Stream of Consciousness Painting, 2007, Household gloss on canvas, 216 x 216 in

Beautiful, childish, expressive, tastless, not art, oversimplistic, throw away,
kid's stuff painting, 1996, Household gloss on canvas with motor, 144 in diameterBeautiful, childish, expressive, tastless, not art, oversimplistic, throw away, kid's stuff painting, 1996, Household gloss on canvas with motor, 144 in diameter

Diphenylpyraline, 2001, Household gloss on canvas, 479 x 119 cmDiphenylpyraline, 2001, Household gloss on canvas, 479 x 119 cm

St Bartholomew, Exquistite Pain, 2008, Gold-plated silver, 98.43 x 43.31 x 37.4 inSt Bartholomew, Exquistite pain, 2008, Gold-plated silver, 98.43 x 43.31 x 37.4 in

Fear of Flying, 2008-2009, Shark, steel, glass, silicone and formaldehyde solution, 84.25 x 151.02 x 55.83 inFear of Flying, 2008-2009, Shark, steel, glass, silicone and formaldehyde solution, 84.25 x 151.02 x 55.83 in

Fear of Flying, 2008-2009, Shark, steel, glass, silicone and formaldehyde solution,
84.25 x 151.02 x 55.83 inFear of Flying, 2008-2009, Shark, steel, glass, silicone and formaldehyde solution, 84.25 x 151.02 x 55.83 in

The Immortal, 1997-2005, Shark, steel, glass, silicone and formaldehyde solution,
102.76 x 202.44 x 95.98 inThe Immortal, 1997-2005, Shark, steel, glass, silicone and formaldehyde solution, 102.76 x 202.44 x 95.98 in

The Immortal, 1997-2005, Shark, steel, glass, silicone and formaldehyde solution,
102.76 x 202.44 x 95.98 inThe Immortal, 1997-2005, Shark, steel, glass, silicone and formaldehyde solution, 102.76 x 202.44 x 95.98 in

The Virgin Mother, 2005-6, Painted bronze, 402.83 x 181.89 x 81.3 inThe Virgin Mother, 2005-6, Painted bronze, 402.83 x 181.89 x 81.3 in

The Virgin Mother, 2005-6, Painted bronze, 402.83 x 181.89 x 81.3 in402.83 x 181.89 x 81.3 in

The Virgin Mother, 2005-6, Painted bronze, 402.83 x 181.89 x 81.3 inThe Virgin Mother, 2005-6, Painted bronze, 402.83 x 181.89 x 81.3 in

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