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Damien Hirst's Psalm: Judica, Domino was published by Other Criteria in 2015 https://t.co/xLyO5GNIKc https://t.co/zxepzgz4pR
4 hours ago

Tom Ormond: Sunbeam, part of the series Eight Horizons, published by Other Criteria in 2014 https://t.co/EkUmPMSbgJ https://t.co/GA48QwX71H
Yesterday

Damien Hirst's ‘The Souls’ – published by Paul Stolper & Other Criteria, 2010 https://t.co/ONmp3eU1bu https://t.co/92e1D6ZF6e
2 days ago

Join Other Criteria London @NPSGallery tonight from 6–8pm for the launch of our this new exhibition catalogue:… https://t.co/RULDASdYQA
2 weeks ago

Last Day at Market Art + Design in the Hamptons #DamienHirst https://t.co/u4MXQ0qUqh
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Join us booth 411 at #MarketArtDesign to see new works by #DamienHirst & #HarlandMiller https://t.co/lZELnGKbbF https://t.co/zfQ5A5vjvR
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Don't miss Other Criteria and @NPSGallery at @artcarbootfair tomorrow from 12–6pm in Vauxhall, London… https://t.co/Bl3fEsI81E
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Bruce Nauman / mindfuck

January 31, 2013 by Kay

30 January – 9 March 2013 Hauser & Wirth, London

From 30 January, Hauser & Wirth will present ‘Bruce Nauman / mindfuck’ in the North Gallery, Savile Row. Curated by Philip Larratt-Smith, the exhibition features a rigorous selection of works from throughout Nauman’s career, with a particular emphasis on his iconic neon sculptures and installations.

Run from Fear, Fun from Rear, 1972 Neon tubing with clear glass tubing suspension frame Two parts: 20.3 x 116.8 x 5.7 cm / 8 x 46 x 2 1/4 in 18.4 x 113 x 5.7 cm / 7 1/4 x 44 1/2 x 2 1/4 in Private Collection

To speak about the work of Bruce Nauman in the language of psychoanalytic theory is a complex task, given the heterogeneity of his production and the variety of schools of psychoanalytic thought. How is it that the critical discourse surrounding a body of work whose central themes are human nature, the mind-body split, language, sex, death, and aggression, has repressed its obvious psychoanalytic and psychological implications? The experience of certain works by Nauman approximates a state of trauma, equivalent to the conversion symptoms of the hysteric, to the utterances of the psychotic, to the repetition compulsion tied to the death drive, to the reprimands of the superego, to good and bad internal objects, and to the logic of dreams. Undergirding all of his work is an uncanny ability to create visual and experiential equivalents for metapsychology and to tap into the deep structure of the human unconscious.

Untitled (Helman Gallery Parallelogram) (Detail), 1971 Wallboard, green fluorescent lights 458 x 552 x 691 cm / 180 3/8 x 217 x 3/8 x 272 in Glenstone
© 2012 Bruce Nauman / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / DACS London

The exhibition’s title, ‘mindfuck’, is a slang term that may be used as both a noun and verb, situation and action. It can mean to brainwash or manipulate someone, or describe a distressing situation or incomprehensible event. A ‘mindfucker’ is anyone who makes a living by playing with the heads of his clientele, be it a guru, a psychoanalyst, a prostitute, or an artist. Like Nauman’s deceptively simple phrases, which turn on puns and reversals and often defy rational understanding, the vernacular ‘mindfuck’ distills in a single word the dichotomies and aporias that the exhibition proposes to explore, literally yoking together the rational and the intuitive, the verbal and the unutterable, the abstract and the physical.

For more information, visit the Hauser & Wirth website.

Angus Fairhurst, Un-titled

January 29, 2013 by Kay

24 January – 16 March 2013

Installation view, 2013

In January 2013, Sadie Coles HQ presents Un- titled, an exhibition of works by Angus Fairhurst (1966-2008). The concept of ‘undoing’ pervaded Fairhurst’s art – absence was an ever-present motif. Words such as ‘unwritten’, ‘undone’, and ‘untouched’ formed many of his titles. This exhibition, Un-titled, paraphrases these terms of negation and reversal. Encompassing a variety of media including sculpture, painting, collage and photography, the exhibition brings to the fore the cycles and oppositions that were at the core of his thinking – doing and undoing, absence and presence, thinking and feeling.

Mnemonic Table, 1997-2004

For more information, visit Sadie Coles website.

Antony Gormley's Model at White Cube

January 23, 2013 by Kay

28 November 2012 – 10 February 2013

White Cube, Bermondsey

White Cube Bermondsey is pleased to present ‘Model’, an exhibition of major new works by Antony Gormley. Challenging the physical possibilities of the gallery space, this ambitious exhibition investigates our experience of architecture through the body and of the body through architecture.

Made in direct response to the space of the South Galleries is the vast, new work Model (2012), which is also the title of the exhibition. Fabricated from 100 tonnes of weathering sheet steel, the work is both sculpture and building, human in form but at no point visible as a total figure. Visitors will be able to enter the work through a 'foot' and journey through its inter-connected internal chambers, the sculpture demanding that we adjust our pace and bend our bodies to its awkward yet absolute geometry. The experience of this analogy for the 'dark interior of the body' is guided by anticipation and memory and the direct and indirect light which penetrates the structure and which leads us on, as if through a labyrinth.

Model, 2012, 197 5/8 x 1275 9/16 x 535 7/16 in. (502 x 3240 x 1360 cm),
Weathering steel

The central corridor of the gallery will hold new sculptures built of solid iron blocks whose uncompromising orthogonals belie their emotional punch. Propping up the architecture, articulating a corner or lying flat on the ground, these dark works test the bounding condition of the space. Their sculptural language is highly reduced, in some cases so schematic that the body form is rendered purely abstract, but without any loss of human empathy.

The exhibition also features a selection of Gormley's working models, installed on a series of tables. Revealing processes that can be both playful and disciplined, the installation suggests a workshop full of ideas and procedures, methods and materials.

These works, together with a series of new expansion pieces, create an exhibition which powerfully extends Gormley's exploration of the body as a site of transformation.

Corridor

Michael Craig-Martin's Alphabet

January 17, 2013 by Kay

12 January - 10 February 2013

The Gallery, Winchester Discovery Centre

Michael Craig-Martin is one of the most influential British artists of recent decades. He was a key figure for the YBA generation of artists, whom he taught in his capacity as tutor at Goldsmiths College of Art.

The Hayward Gallery’s touring exhibition Alphabet is a series of 26 screenprints by Craig-Martin in which the letters of the alphabet are overlaid with everyday objects, set against a background of vivid monochrome colours.

Created in his signature style, Craig-Martin plays with the idea of the ABC children’s primer. Instead of a direct 'A is for Apple', 'B is for Ball', the relationship between the letter and image depicted is not instantly obvious and requires some guesswork.

Mat Collishaw - THIS IS NOT AN EXIT

January 14, 2013 by Kay

14 February 2013 – 30 March 2013

Blain Southern, Hanover Square, London

Mat Collishaw - Sinners, 2012 (detail), Oil on canvas, 225 X 225 cm

For his second solo exhibition at Blain|Southern, THIS IS NOT AN EXIT, the British artist Mat Collishaw returns to the medium of oil painting. However, as is usual with his practice, nothing is literal; the primary source material - magnified images drawn from the pages of glossy magazines - is a simple metaphor, one part of a prism conceived to examine moral questions provoked by the excessive binge culture that preceded the global financial crisis.

When seen from a distance, these large-scale works appear to be abstract paintings constructed on a classic modernist grid; closer inspection reveals them to be scraps of advertisements for luxury goods culled from ‘lifestyle’ magazines like Tatler and Vogue. But this is only partially the case; they are in fact facsimiles of the precisely folded, origami-like ‘wraps’ used by drug dealers to package cocaine, complete with powdery traces of the narcotic.

Our susceptibility to sensational imagery has long been central to Collishaw’s work, and these sumptuous paintings continue this tradition. For all their apparent swagger, they are in reality depictions of nothingness, revealing the symbiotic space that exists between illusion and reality, absence and presence. More prosaically, they are emblematic of the craven, insatiable aspect of human nature that will pursue something to its very end whatever the consequences, and yet inevitably remain unfulfilled. It is this unending vicious cycle to which Collishaw alludes in the exhibition’s title; there is no escape – this is not an exit – the words used at the close of Bret Easton Ellis’ novel American Psycho, which satirised the excesses of Wall Street in the 1980s.

As with all of Collishaw’s oeuvre, multiple layers of meaning exist; the grid structure teasingly feeds into the theories propounded by the French philosopher Gilles Deleuze in his seminal work The Fold, in which he argues that the world can be interpreted as a body of infinite folds and surfaces that twist and weave through compressed time and space. Meanwhile, in taking magazine images first used to advertise consumerist dreams, then for selling cocaine, and finally as artworks hanging on the walls of a commercial gallery, Collishaw offers a wry comment on the all-devouring nature of capitalism.

His use of trompe l’oeil, making the squares of paper appear three-dimensional, meditates further on the idea of illusion and reality, while his harnessing of the geometric styles of Modernist painting contradict this. Indeed, Collishaw sees the exhibition, in part, as a debasement of the medium of painting, the most traditional art historical medium.‘You can’t just paint – you have to address the whole history of painting and then make some sort of paradigm shift,’ he says. ‘I’ve been trying to find a way to do this, and this is my solution.’

THIS IS NOT AN EXIT will be marked by the most comprehensive publication of Collishaw’s practice to date, including an essay by art historian Sue Hubbard and interview by Rachel Campbell-Johnson.

For more information visit the Blain Southern website.

Tracey Emin at White Cube

January 11, 2013 by Kay

You Don't Believe in Love But I Believe in You - Tracey Emin

2 December 2012 – 23 February 2013 White Cube, Sao Paulo

For more information and images, visit the White Cube website.

'Instructions - Tilt To and Fro', Lenticular Prints 1967 - Present

January 10, 2013 by Kay

Paul Stolper Gallery has an exhibition opening tonight 'Instructions - Tilt To and Fro', Lenticular Prints 1967 - Present. Artists Include Peter Blake, Mat Collishaw, Damien Hirst, Paul Fryer, and more.

The lenticular printing technique creates an illusion of depth when the work is tilted to and fro or the viewer moves around the artwork.

PAUL STOLPER, 31 MUSEUM STREET, LONDON WC1A 1LH

For the Love of God - Lenticular - Damien Hirst

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