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Artist Gonzalo Lebrija is currently part of a group exhibition at @museomaz in Mexico https://t.co/c1fpm3lRxQ https://t.co/GigMtMzMCG
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Gonzalo Lebrija at MAZ Museo de Arte de Zapopan

June 20, 2017 by Mary

Eduardo Abaroa, Miguel Andrade Valdez. Julieta Aranda. Iván Argote, Diego Berruecos, Stefan Benchoam / Byron Mármol, Marcelo Cidade, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Jose Dávila, Helen Escobedo / Paolo Gori, Radamés “Juni” Figueroa / Melvin Laz, Mathias Goeritz, Alejandro de la Guerra, Cynthia Gutiérrez, Pablo Helguera, Juan Fernando Herrán, Ximena Labra, Runo Lagomarsino,  Gonzalo Lebrija, Anuar Maauad, José Carlos Martinat, Pedro Meyer, Mario Navarro, Amalia Pica, Claudia Rodríguez, Ruta de la Amistad, Guillermo Santamarina / Colectivo Sector Reforma, Luis Miguel Suro, Tercerunquinto, Emanuel Tovar y Adrián Villar Rojas

The result of an examination of public sculpture and urban monuments, the exhibition Monumentos, anti-monumentos y nueva escultura pública surveys contemporary artistic practices in Mexico and Latin America that question the idea of public sculptures, monuments, and memorials, inviting viewers to rethink the issues connected with both the real and the symbolic occupation of public space.

The exhibition is divided into three sections. First, there is a photographic archive of Mexican monuments assembled by Helen Escobedo and Paolo Gori in the 1980s, which includes images of public sculptures all over Mexico. The collection contains motifs that have come to be a part of Mexico’s national identity busts of heroes, allegorical representations of the nation, reinterpretations of pre-Hispanic history–but also includes sculptures of wider imaginative scope, such as a monument to the snail, and others to aspects of everyday life.

The second section presents historical material related to the international project organised by Mathias Goeritz for the 1968 Olympic Games: The Route of Friendship, a series of monumental abstract sculptures installed in the vicinity of the various sporting venues, which involved the participation of twenty-two artists of different nationalities. These works are still preserved in Mexico City.

The exhibition continues with the work of contemporary artists who have dealt with these same themes. The roles played by political figures in dictatorships and authoritarian regimes, the commemoration of tragedies, and collective histories are documented through photography, videos, installations, and monumental sculptures that question the very nature of the format.

The project invites reflection on various pressing issues. What constitutes public space and who is authorised to use it? Is the erection of monuments an effective strategy for building an identity? Is public art a mechanism for the construction of ideologies? What possibilities are offered by contemporary art in our cities to engage us responsibly with public space, as agents and not just as spectators?

  • MAZ Museo de Arte de Zapopan
    Andador 20 de Noviembre 166, Zapopan, Mexico


From 31 March until 30th July, 2017

Rachel Howard at Galería Pelaires

June 8, 2017 by Mary

Galería Pelaires is delighted to present Gregor Hildebrandt, Rachel Howard and Idris Khan on the occasion of Art Palma Summer. Conceptualised by Ashwin Thadani and Fedreric Pinya, the group exhibition highlights a contemporary fascination with matter, particularly with lines, and a mutual effect arising from it: an aesthetic dialogue through and with contemporary art. The works of Hildebrandt, Howard and Khan are all abstract and minimal in their own way, challenging the notion of contemporary painting by differing material and techniques. They are capable of reflecting the moods that persisted while being created and of sensually conveying them to the viewer.

What we encounter in and with the works of Hildebrandt, Howard and Khan are differing surfaces creating a mutual effect: they invite us to immerse into their depth, thereby aiming to dissolve the distance between viewer, artist and image. Although referring to his or her individual sources of art historical, philosophical or musical inspirations (to name but a few: Hildebrandt is currently inspired by the Brazilian singer-songwriter Toco; Howard is drawn to Utagawa Kuniyoashi, a Japanese printmaker of the late 18th century; and Khan - quite literally - reacts to the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche and his book “The Birth of Tragedy”), their strongest commonality is the peculiar capability to visually depict and mentally evoke an intense mobile boundlessness that spreads over the four corners of the image. In this over- powering moment of experiencing human emotions, embodied in-between lines of paint, vinyl and words, the viewer is confronted with the experience of the sublime. 

Rachel Howard’s approach to creating a contemporary painting is based on oil paint and canvas. We see differently sized colour fields that are sharply intersected by lines and sometimes patterns. At a closer look, Howard’s surfaces possess a three-dimensional – if not architectural – quality, achieved through an intensive experimentation with oil paint and other matter that encourages it to spreads over the canvas. Her signature feature is the use of gravity as an invisible paintbrush, creating lines that seem to contain a large spectrum of formal behaviour: they may end in delicate grids, form abstract patterns and shapes that occasionally allude to landscapes. Even in her more figurative works, the lines are still present, often traversing or even carrying the contours of the painted figure.

Rachel Howard: Undone, 2017
Oil on linen, 91.44 x 76.2 cm 

Howard once described her artistic practice close to that of an alchemist, constantly trying to apprehend the transmutability of matters. Her painted surfaces are, in fact, often literally disrupted, resembling the remains of a physical experiment. It is the artist’s longstanding preoccupation with the behaviour of oil paint when mixing it with diverse substances, as well as her on-going interest in the progression of lines that leaves such alchemistic traces on her canvases. The resulting line patterns not only convey Howard’s behavioural studies on matter and form. Moreover, they also invite the viewer to immerse into the painting to experience a certain calmness of the mind –supported by a stable scaffolding of lines. 

2nd June – 13th September 2007

PELAIRES CENTRE CULTURAL CONTEMPORANI

C. Can Verí, 3
07001 Palma de Mallorca