Latest Tweets

RT @FinancialTimes: What Damien Hirst did next https://t.co/uNL1yCuSEa
Yesterday

At @artcentralhk booth E06 until Saturday 25th March https://t.co/Tvc2BiSenB https://t.co/oGZJDKYRAM
2 days ago

NEW Damien Hirst's Limited Edition Print successfully launched at Art Central Hong Kong https://t.co/LhhwFnx2QN… https://t.co/9WtsDAaOvQ
4 days ago

Sneak pic from our booth E06 at @artcentralhk #ArtCentral2017 #HongKong https://t.co/pRK74gCZOb
5 days ago

Gavin Turk @NPSGallery: End of Show Flash Sale Starting Now! Until the exhibition ends, Sunday 26th March, 6pm GMT… https://t.co/mkR5TDLGnh
2 weeks ago

Rachel Howard both at the Italian Cultural Institute @iiclondra & the @jerwoodgallery from 15 March 2017… https://t.co/jOJpOeP4N4
2 weeks ago

Looking forward to @artcentralhk! 20th–25th March #DamienHirst #GaryHume #MustafaHulusi https://t.co/ZTG2Egn1YR https://t.co/ED4EgpLzmc
3 weeks ago

Keith Tyson - Panta Rhei

February 26, 2013 by Kay

Pace London is pleased to present Panta Rhei, an exhibition of new work by Turner Prize recipient Keith Tyson at 6 Burlington Gardens. The exhibition features sixteen paintings inspired by poetry, music, and personal references, executed by the artist over the last three years. Panta Rhei, which translates as “everything flows” in Ancient Greek, embodies the idea of a world in perpetual motion, a fundamental concept for Tyson.

Drawing parallels between previous bodies of work, Tyson explains: “In the past, I’ve always tried to represent what I call the ’Field’, which for me, is the myriad of networks – whether physical, conceptual or emotional – that make the present moment. All these systems combined form our interdependent world. I attempted to reflect these associations through sculptures, in the immersive installation Large Field Array or on a smaller scale, through the fluid dynamics of the Nature Paintings. This time, I wanted to gather the ideas and techniques I’d learnt in previous pieces and work exclusively with paint to compose visual poems.”

One of the techniques that Tyson uses is to paint over an existing work or on a blank canvas, and then scrape paint over the surface. This scraped layer is then used as the ground for a second image. The objective is to generate interferences and give rise to what Tyson refers to as “complex surfaces” formed of two or more different images sharing a connection.

Highlights include Panta Rhei, a small ten-by-six-inch piece that lends its name to the exhibition, that was originally derived from a painting of a sailing boat found in a second-hand shop. Reworked by Tyson, the new painting features a modern harbour scene and consequently combines imagery and techniques from two moments that occurred a century apart. The breeze in the trees, meanwhile, was executed in the English countryside and features interpretations of the same oak tree layered on top of one another, conveying the passage of the seasons and the changing mood of the artist over time. This work also represents the first time that Tyson has painted outside of his Sussex studio.

For more information, visit Pace London website.